Building your brand is super important for any business owner. The demand for change is the hot topic in technology and retail, and therefore every other market. The onus is on staying relevant in such a fast-moving consumer and news environment. This is true to an extent but the longer-term rhythms of consumer behaviour and buying habits remain solid. This applies from seasonal buying to gifting for birthdays. From other anniversaries to large purchases centred around certain stages of life and it all applies to both on and offline.

The brand of your business, or the perception of what your business is to the outside world, is also a constant while you refresh products or explore other directions to go in. All this is building your brand. But what happens when your logo starts to look dated? Or a direction you’ve chosen to go in starts to make the brand you have built look out of place or the wrong fit?

..you are the custodian of the brand and of your business. Being loyal to your customer base and not chasing everything that appears shiny will reflect well in the long run.

Knowing when to refresh the brand furniture or logo, and at the same time not lose the value that has built up in the existing framework, is a key juncture in the lifecycle of the company. It’s not one to be taken lightly. Sometimes, when an opportunity presents itself, this may have to happen fast to take advantage but this can be dealt with in different ways. In general, building the brand or changing it should be a considered and structured process.

  • The logo and materials. Yours may be a logo which everyone makes a comment on or it may be the opposite. The perception attached to it can be held in too much importance. However, it’s the consistent quality of the work will be the thing that carries the value. Having an instantly recognisable, easily-transferable image is important but not crucial. If only to make your life easier and more efficient. Changing it carries the burden of retaining characteristics whilst looking contemporary and up-to-date.
  • How far does the brand go? Once you change your look or start to build in other directions, being methodical in bringing all that you’ve done before with you is a task but a vital one. Being relevant to the retail partner you took on back in year one, and making sure their customers know of your new direction, is a must.
  • It would be easy to get carried away and push the brand into markets and areas where you do not have the requisite knowledge of conditions particular to that place. Spreading the business, and perception too thinly will only have adverse reactions to sales eventually.

In short, you are the custodian of the brand and of your business. Being loyal to your customer base and not chasing everything that appears shiny will reflect well in the long run. Short term this may seem counterintuitive but realising this aspect alone will save you vital time and energy.

 

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